Southern Ireland

Motorcycle Hire for Southern Ireland (Irish Republic)

Southern Ireland can best truly be experienced to it’s full glory and majesty if on a motorcycle. Southern Ireland, can be ridden from it’s most northern border to it’s most southern point in less than three hours but this goes nowhere near experiencing Southern Ireland at it’s best. A marvellous country with superb scenic roads and some of the most friendly and genuine people you will ever meet.

For a full list of upcoming events, see the Discover Ireland website here ->

 

The Wild Atlantic way is a tourism trail that follows the Atlantic coastline from the north of Donegal to south coast of Cork. The 2,500 km (1553 miles) driving route passes through nine counties and three provinces, stretching from County Donegal’s Inishowen Peninsula to the southern town of Kinsale in County Cork on the coast of the Celtic Sea.

Some of the stops on the way we recommend:

Donegal

County is made up of castles, rugged coastline and mountains such as the quartzite Mount Errigal. Glenveagh National Park, once a private estate, encompasses forests, lakes and bogland in the Derryveagh Mountains. Its 1870s manor house, the Scottish Baronial-style Glenveagh Castle, is known for its Victorian gardens.


Sligo

The town of Sligo straddles the Garavogue River where it meets Sligo Bay. It’s known for its literary heritage and rugged countryside. Ruined medieval Sligo Abbey has carved tombs and a 15th-century altar.

 

Westport

Westport is a town on the edge of an Atlantic inlet, on the west coast. In the Georgian town centre, stone bridges link the tree-lined promenade on the banks of the Carrowbeg River.


Galway

Galway, a harbour city on the west coast, sits where the River Corrib meets the Atlantic Ocean. The city’s hub is 18th-century Eyre Square, a popular meeting spot surrounded by shops and traditional pubs that often offer live Irish folk music.

 

Doolin

Doolin is a village on the west coast. It’s known as a gateway to the ancient sites on the Aran Islands, which are just offshore. The towering Cliffs of Moher lie southwest of town.

 

Lahinch

Lahinch or Lehinch is a small town on Liscannor Bay, on the northwest coast of County Clare

 

Tralee

Tralee is a town in County Kerry. It’s known for the Rose of Tralee International Festival. A glass wall in Tralee Town Park bears the names of all the contestants in that festival’s beauty pageant. The Kerry County Museum has galleries on local history and a re-creation of medieval Tralee. Nearby, the National Folk Theatre of Ireland, Siamsa Tíre, puts on Irish music and dance performances.

 

Dingle

Dingle is a small port town in the southwest, known for its rugged scenery, trails and sandy beaches. A statue of long-time harbour resident Fungie the dolphin is by the waterfront

 

Portemagee

Portmagee is a village in County Kerry. The village is located on the Iveragh peninsula south of Valentia Island, and is known locally as ‘the ferry’, in reference to its purpose as a crossing point to the island.

 

Bantry

Bantry is a town in the civil parish of Kilmocomoge in the barony of Bantry on the coast of West Cork, County Cork. It lies at the head of Bantry Bay, a deep-water gulf extending for 30 km to the west.

 

Baltimore

Baltimore is a village in western County Cork. It is the main village in the parish of Rathmore and the Islands, the southernmost parish in Ireland.

 

Kinsale

Kinsale is a town on the southern coast, in County Cork. Two 17th-century fortresses overlook the River Bandon: the vast, star-shaped Charles Fort to the southeast, and the smaller James Fort on the river’s opposite bank. The 16th-century courthouse building houses the Kinsale Regional Museum, with a variety of displays on local history and information about the 1915 sinking of the RMS Lusitania.